https://resources.lupus.org/entry/what-causes-lupus

What causes lupus?

Lupus Foundation of America

Resource Content

Many (but not all) scientists believe that lupus develops in response to a combination of factors both inside and outside the body, including hormones, genetics, and environment.

Hormones

Hormones are the body’s messengers. They regulate many of the body’s functions. Because nine of every 10 occurrences of lupus are in females, researchers have looked at the relationship between estrogen and lupus.

While men and women both produce estrogen, its production is much greater in females. Many women have more lupus symptoms before menstrual periods and/or during pregnancy when estrogen production is high. This may indicate that estrogen somehow regulates the severity of lupus. However, no causal effect has been proven between estrogen, or any other hormone, and lupus. And, studies of women with lupus taking estrogen in either birth control pills or as postmenopausal therapy have shown no increase in significant disease activity. Researchers are now focusing on differences between men and women, beyond hormone levels, which may account for why women are more prone to lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

Genetics

Researchers have now identified more than 50 genes which they associate with lupus. These genes are more commonly seen in people with lupus than in those without the disease, and while most of these genes have not been shown to directly cause lupus, they are believed to contribute to it.

25% The chance an identical twin of someone with lupus will also develop the disease.

In most cases, genes are not enough.  This is especially evident with twins who are raised in the same environment and have the same inherited features yet only one develops lupus. Although, when one of two identical twins has lupus, there is an increased chance that the other twin will also develop the disease (30% percent chance for identical twins; 5-10% percent chance for fraternal twins).

Lupus can develop in people with no family history of it, but there are likely to be other autoimmune diseases in some family members.

Certain ethnic groups (people of African, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Island descent) have a greater risk of developing lupus, which may be related to genes they have in common.

Environment

Most researchers today think that an environmental agent, such as a virus or possibly a chemical, randomly encountered by a genetically susceptible individual, acts to trigger the disease. Researchers have not identified a specific environmental agent as yet but the hypothesis remains likely.

While the environmental elements that can trigger lupus and cause flares aren’t fully known, the most commonly cited are ultraviolet light (UVA and UVB); infections (including the effects of the Epstein-Barr virus), and exposure to silica dust in agricultural or industrial settings.

Other examples of potential environmental triggers include:

  • Ultraviolet rays from the sun and/or fluorescent light bulbs
  • Sulfa drugs, which make a person more sensitive to the sun, such as: Bactrim® and Septra® (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole); sulfisoxazole (Gantrisin®); tolbutamide (Orinase®); sulfasalazine (Azulfidine®); diuretics
  • Sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)
  • Penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)
  • Infection, colds or viral illnesses
  • Exhaustion
  • Emotional stress, such as divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications
  • Anything else that causes stress to the body such as surgery, physical harm, injury, pregnancy, or giving birth

Can anything be done to slow or prevent the development of lupus?

Early diagnosis, as well as avoiding triggers for the disease, such as excessive exposure to the sun, can aid in the management of lupus. A rheumatologist -- a specialist in conditions of the muscles, joints, and bones -- can treat lupus with a number of medications that can effectively slow the progress of disease. However, therapy is often tailored to lessen the individual's particular symptoms. 

Medically reviewed on